Latest collaboration with Inclusive Entrepreneur James Holt: Creating Music Video to Raise Awareness of Domestic Abuse

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In 2020, Universal Inclusion and Inclusive Entrepreneur Network CEO and Founder Jacqueline Winstanley collaborated with Inclusive Entrepreneur Network member  James Holt on his latest track "One Hand Strikes The Other", which raises awareness about domestic abuse. 

Through this collaboration, Jacqueline was the advisor for the video, providing insights on the treatment of the message. This is another initative that continues the theme of opening up the creative space. Music is a powerful medium which in the hands of a skilled artist touches a deep emotion thorugh the lyrics and melody.

James has just released the video which accompanies the single "One Hand Strikes the Other" in aid of @FortaliceBolton. The single explores an abusive relationship, looking at it from the outside. It shifts the focus from the relationship to the observer - suggesting we all have a duty of care and a responsibility in reducing domestic abuse.

James has worked on the track with two female artists - singer/songwriter Toria Wooff and photographer Debbie Ellis who captured model Liv Moore, depicted on the image.

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Jacqueline Winstanley participates in panel discussion on the launch of OECD Report : The Missing Entrepreneurs 2021

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Not everyone has an equal opportunity to transform their ideas into a #business.

Jacqueline Winstanley FRSA, CEO and Founder of Universal Inclusion and The Inclusive Entrepreneur Network participated in a panel discussion that highlighted the lived experiences of those who face barriers to creating enterprise. Jacqueline stressed the need to include disabled people in future research, and how global governments and policy makers can support and upscale the sector, increasing inclusive economic growth.
The panel discussion was part of the launch of the new report and brought together the views of the European Commission, the #OECD and the Global Entrepreneurship Network. It took took place following the presentation of the main findings and discussion on priorities actions for governments as highlighted in the report.
The launch took place on November 30, 2021 and can be viewed below:

 

 

The Missing Entrepreneurs 2021

 

The Missing Entrepreneurs 2021The Missing Entrepreneurs 2021 is the sixth edition in a series of biennial reports that examine how public policies at national, regional and local levels can support job creation, economic growth and social inclusion by overcoming obstacles to business start-ups and self-employment by people from disadvantaged or under-represented groups in entrepreneurship.

It shows that there are substantial untapped opportunities for entrepreneurship in populations such as women, youth, the unemployed, and immigrants and highlights the need for more differentiated government entrepreneurship policies that respond to the specific barriers they face.

The report includes an assessment of the impact of COVID-19 across these populations of entrepreneurs and the effectiveness of the policy response. It also contains thematic policy chapters on microfinance and leveraging the potential of immigrant entrepreneurs. These chapters present the range of current policy actions in EU and OECD countries and make recommendations for future policy directions.

Finally, the report contains country profiles for each of the 27 EU Member States that identify for each county the major recent trends in entrepreneurship by women, youth, seniors and immigrants, the key policy issues and the recent policy actions.

Download the report here

Click here for the link to the OECD  

Click here for the link to the European Commission (EU)

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Birkbeck CIMR Report on Unlocking the Potential of Disabled Entrepreneurs

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Jacqueline Winstanley FRSA, CEO and Founder of Universal Inclusion and The Inclusive Entrepreneur Network, chaired a Birkbeck CIMR debate on Unlocking the Potential of Disabled Entrepreneurs on Wednesday September 22nd 2021. This debate is part of the Centre for Innovation Management Research CIMR Debates and Workshops in Public Policy series and was held in collaboration with the All Party Parliamentary Group for Inclusive Entrepreneurship. Jacqueline was joined by speakers David Walsh, Dr Eva Kašperová, Beth Kume-Holland and David Halabisky. 

Following is the report issued by Birkbeck CIMR after the debate.

Unlocking the potential of disabled entrepreneurs

Image of a set of coloured pencils, with the nibs pointing upwards

In this panel event, researchers and practitioners in inclusive entrepreneurship came together to explore a co-designed pathway to support disabled entrepreneurs.

In 2020, the disability employment gap increased by 0.7 percentage points, meaning that the employment rate of disabled people is now 28.8% lower than that of people who are not disabled. Yet despite facing additional challenges to enter the job market, disabled people are rarely encouraged to consider self-employment.

In the first of this term’s CIMR Debates and Workshops in Public Policy, academics and practitioners came together to challenge current thinking on the self-employment of disabled people. Panellists called for the government’s Levelling Up agenda to go beyond what is currently available for supporting disabled entrepreneurs and to tackle the issues affecting their successful participation in the ecosystem.

This online event was introduced by Dr Lisa Cameron MP, Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Inclusive Entrepreneurship and chaired by Jacqueline Winstanley FRSA, Founder and CEO of Universal Inclusion and The Inclusive Entrepreneur Network. Speaking with a stellar panel who are researching and working in the inclusive entrepreneurship space, Jacqueline posed some of the key questions needed to address policy improvement in this area.

What leads disabled people into entrepreneurship?

Dr Eva Kašperová, Research Fellow at the Centre for Research in Ethnic Minority Entrepreneurship (CREME), Aston Business School, with interest in inclusive entrepreneurship and enterprise policy and support, began the discussion by sharing some of the key motivations for disabled entrepreneurs:

  • The prospect of greater autonomy and financial reward
  • Greater flexibility over work tasks, hours and location
  • Recognising a gap in the market, notably for disability-related products or services
  • A desire to make a difference and contribute to society
  • For those who have acquired a disability later in life, as a way of coping with a major life change and channelling feelings of frustration or hopelessness into something positive

Far from being unlikely entrepreneurs, Eva’s research shows that disabled people are more likely to start their own business than non-disabled people and are also more likely to set up a social enterprise.

What are the challenges faced by disabled entrepreneurs?

Jacqueline posed the second question to panellist Beth Kume-Holland, Founder of Patchwork Hub and MOKOM.  Beth represented the Inclusive Entrepreneurship Network and shared its findings in her Ambassador role, also reflecting on her own entrepreneurial journey.

  • Lack of awareness and understanding of accessibility, both physically and virtually
  • Inconsistent support available across the UK
  • Lack of integration of disability and entrepreneurship support
  • The inaccessibility of the mainstream startup space, which often glorifies burnout or focuses on building a business alongside 9-5 work
  • Co-designing all programmes of support (mainstream or disability-specific) with people with lives experience of disability, and recompensing disabled people for their expertise and time, as with all other professions.

Beth praised support networks like the Inclusive Entrepreneur network as a ‘lifeline’ to disabled entrepreneurs and called for policy change to create genuinely inclusive startup and scale-up programmes to effectively support disabled entrepreneurs.

What support is needed for disabled entrepreneurs?

David Walsh, Managing Partner of FlameFlinch Partners LLP, Chairman of Supernotes and Chairman of the Malta Business Network (UK) argued that support for disabled entrepreneurs needs to tackle multiple areas, including mentorship, specific expertise, different KPIs and support extended to co-founders.

Commenting that a lot of business accelerators are generalised in their approach, David called for an elective hub which centres disabled entrepreneurs and attracts people interested in supporting them. He also challenged policymakers to create more innovative solutions for supporters, for example by offering higher tax incentives for supporting entrepreneurs.

What needs to change in current policies affecting these communities?

The panel discussion was concluded by David Halabisky, Economist in the OECD Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs, Regions and Cities. David called for a rethink of the way initiatives are designed, promoted and presented on the web, as the typical image of a young, male entrepreneur in the tech sector persists in many places.

David also suggested that scaling up initiatives in partnership across government, the disabled community and the private sector would ensure that support organisations are equipped to help entrepreneurs. He concluded that for the support system to change, attitudes towards disabled entrepreneurs would likewise need to change.

Co-creating an inclusive future

The panel was followed by a question and answer session that explored these issues further, including how virtual and in-person programmes can be made more accessible and how different groups can collaborate to effect change.

In summing up the session, Jacqueline Winstanley called for a co-designed pathway that combines disability support and entrepreneurship training, ideally sitting in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and not the Department for Work and Pensions. Equitable access to finance and measuring of success that looks beyond turnover were also key takeaways from the event.

In closing, Jacqueline encouraged delegates to watch the Inclusive Entrepreneur showreel, which offers ‘a taste of the future if we can co-design and collaborate’.

We would like to thank everyone who attended this event for helping move forward the discussion on inclusive entrepreneurship.

Further Information:

 

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Jacqueline Winstanley Chairs Birkbeck CIMR Debate on Unlocking the Potential of Disabled Entrepreneurs

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Jacqueline Winstanley Chairs Birkbeck CIMR Debate on Unlocking the Potential of Disabled Entrepreneurs

Jacqueline Winstanley FRSA, CEO and Founder of Universal Inclusion and The Inclusive Entrepreneur Network is the Chair of a Birkbeck CIMR debate on Unlocking the Potential of Disabled Entrepreneurs held on Wednesday September 22nd 2021 at 2.30PM BST.

This debate is part of the Centre for Innovation Management Research CIMR Debates and Workshops in Public Policy series.

Jacqueline is joined by speakers David Walsh, Dr Eva Kašperová, Beth Kume-Holland, David Halabisky. 

ABSTRACT

More people from underserved communities, the likes of persons with disabilities, are turning to self-employment due to particular barriers to their job market participation and additional challenges posed by economic and social trends including the effects of the pandemic. The disability employment gap has increased by 0.7 percentage points in 2020, meaning that the employment rate of disabled people is 28.8 percent lower than that of people who are not disabled (Powell, 2021). Other challenges highlighted in the literature included gender gap, cost of doing business, and the likelihood to find seed fund as common dominant factors reported on the issue of inclusion (Rolle, Kisato, Rock, & Winstanley, 2020).

Additionally, high on the current national policy agenda are inclusivity and diversity challenges in business innovation leading to the creation of an All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Inclusive Entrepreneurship. A report published by Innovate UK in 2019 identified the barriers, challenges, opportunities and support needs for minority ethnic groups and disabled people to participate in business innovation (Vorley, Lawton Smith, Coogan, Owalla, Wing, 2019). The government’s 'levelling up agenda' seeks to level up research and development so that it benefits every corner of the UK. Now is an opportune time for clear policy rationale for increasing diversity and inclusion in innovation-led initiatives at the regional level to ensure that the levelling up agenda is inclusive in practice.

The talks aims to challenge the audience’s understanding on the self-employment of disabled people, to call the policymakers, practitioners and academics to go beyond what is currently available for supporting disabled entrepreneurs and innovators, and to tackle the issues affecting their successful participation in the ecosystem.

This event will debate the key issues: 

  • What is leading disabled people to entrepreneurship?
  • What are the challenges faced by disabled entrepreneurs and relevant support networks?
  • What kind of support is available and needed for disabled entrepreneurs in the UK?
  • What needs to change in current policies affecting these communities?

As Jacqueline Winstanley said, "This debate is timely, providing great insights into this growing sector and how government can drive the innovation and growth within it. We continue to lead in this space as we actively build the Inclusive Entrepreneur Network providing an authoritative voice. The debate will continue to raise awareness, and through our role as Secretariat to the APPG for Inclusive Entrepreneurship led by Dr Lisa Cameron MP, reinforce the 2-year programme of works and subsequent recommendations to Government on how they can support and upscale."

 

BIOGRAPHIES 

David Walsh is Managing Partner of Flamefinch Partners LLP, Chairman of Supernotes (a leading collaborative learning solution), and Chairman of the Malta Business Network (UK). In 1996, he founded Crimsonwing, an international software company that grew to a business of 500 staff across Europe before being acquired by KPMG. Past Chair roles include Thrive Partners and Level Global. David is King’s College London’s Entrepreneur in Residence at King’s Entrepreneurial Institute. David funds the David Walsh Awards at King’s to recognise excellence in entrepreneurship. David was the winner of the Helen Hudson Award, King’s Alumni of the Year, 2020, and was awarded a Fellowship of King’s College in 2021.

Dr Eva Kašperová is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Research in Ethnic Minority Entrepreneurship (CREME), Aston Business School, with interest in inclusive entrepreneurship and enterprise policy and support. Eva’s doctoral research looked at the experiences of disabled people and those with long-term health conditions of starting and running a business in the UK. Eva has published in journals such as the International Small Business Journal and the International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation. Prior to joining CREME, Eva was a Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University and a Research Assistant at Small Business Research Centre, Kingston University London.

Beth Kume-Holland is the founder of Patchwork Hub and MOKOM. She is a Harvard University Kennedy Scholar, an Oxford University graduate and an international disability rights advocate. Beth’s previous roles include Citibank’s thought-leadership team for their ‘Global Perspectives & Solutions’ series, Unilever and as a Research Fellow at Oxford University. She recently worked as Audience and Market Insight Lead at Scope, the UK disability charity but is now the founder and director of MOKOM and the award-winning tech startup and social enterprise, Patchwork Hub.

David Halabisky is an economist in the OECD Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs, Regions and Cities. He currently works on several projects related to entrepreneurship policy, including a multi-year project on inclusive entrepreneurship. He is the main author of the “Missing Entrepreneurs” reports.

Jacqueline Winstanley FRSA is the Founder and CEO of Universal Inclusion and The Inclusive Entrepreneur Network. She holds a series of directorships and advisory roles in businesses and organisations including: Secretariat to the All Party Parliamentary Group for Inclusive Entrepreneurship, Advisory Board Chair: Ability Today, Chair: Foundation for Independent Living Trust, Advisory Board Member: New England Sports for Women. She is a former trustee of the DRUK Disability Rights UK, Shaw Trust Power 100 List Judge 2021, Virgin StartUp Mentor and she is a visiting fellow at Centre of Innovation Management Research (CIMR), Birkbeck.

To register for the event, please click HERE.

Image Source: Thank you to Beth Kune-Holland of MOKOM for producing the visuals.

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Jacqueline Winstanley invited to be a Visiting Fellow of the Birbeck University CIRM

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CIMR JW June 21 2021

Jacqueline Winstanley, FRSA has been invited to be a Visiting Fellow at the Birbeck Centre of Innovation Management Research (CIMR).

The Centre for Innovation Management Research draws on a variety of academic disciplines across the fields of management, law, economics and science policy, to deliver high quality research and teaching in the field of innovation and entrepreneurship. Visiting Fellows at Birbeck are special assets for the Centre as they interact closely with the Centre’s Academic Staff and PhD students.

Jacqueline was previously a panel speaker on a Diversity and Entrepreneurship Workshop organised by the Birkbeck CIMR in March 2021, following research by Professor Helen Lawton Smith into addressing regional inequalities in innovation opportunities for BAME and disabled group. Jacqueline was part of this study, and facilitated a workshop, contributed with insights and was included as good practice in the research report, Addressing regional inequalities in innovation opportunities for BAME and disabled groups.

The Diversity and Entrepreneurship Workshop aimed to contribute to the debate on how the UK could better support innovation and entrepreneurship in underrepresented groups. The discussion that followed featured presentations from Jacqueline on Inclusive Entrepreneurship - Removing the conflict between policy intent and administration. Jacqueline also spoke on a panel discussion looking at 'What have we learned about innovation/entrepreneurial opportunities for BAME and disabled entrepreneurs?'

Jacqueline said, " I am honoured to have been asked to be a Visiting Fellow at the Birbeck Centre of Innovation Management Research. As CEO and Founder of Universal Inclusion and The Inclusive Entrepreneur Network and The Secretariat for the UK All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Inclusive Entrepreneurship, we continue our work to change the narrative on inclusive economic growth.

Click here to access the CIMR Newsletter.

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